Free Transplantation of a Tissue Engineered Bone Graft into an Irradiated, Critical-Size Femoral Defect in Rats

dc.contributor.authorRottensteiner-Brandl, Ulrike
dc.contributor.authorBertram, Ulf
dc.contributor.authorLingens, Lara F.
dc.contributor.authorKöhn, Katrin
dc.contributor.authorDistel, Luitpold
dc.contributor.authorFey, Tobias
dc.contributor.authorKörner, Carolin
dc.contributor.authorHorch, Raymund E.
dc.contributor.authorArkudas, Andreas
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-14
dc.date.available2023-10-09T17:16:12Z
dc.date.created2021
dc.date.issued2021-09-14
dc.description.abstractHealing of large bone defects remains a challenge in reconstructive surgery, especially with impaired healing potential due to severe trauma, infection or irradiation. In vivo studies are often performed in healthy animals, which might not accurately reflect the situation in clinical cases. In the present study, we successfully combined a critical-sized femoral defect model with an ionizing radiation protocol in rats. To support bone healing, tissue-engineered constructs were transferred into the defect after ectopic preossification and prevascularization. The combination of SiHA, MSCs and BMP-2 resulted in the significant ectopic formation of bone tissue, which can easily be transferred by means of our custom-made titanium chamber. Implanted osteogenic MSCs survived in vivo for a total of 18 weeks. The use of SiHA alone did not lead to bone formation after ectopic implantation. Analysis of gene expression showed early osteoblast differentiation and a hypoxic and inflammatory environment in implanted constructs. Irradiation led to impaired bone healing, decreased vascularization and lower short-term survival of implanted cells. We conclude that our model is highly valuable for the investigation of bone healing and tissue engineering in pre-damaged tissue and that healing of bone defects can be substantially supported by combining SiHA, MSCs and BMP-2.en
dc.identifier.citationCells 10.9 (2021): 2256. <https://www.mdpi.com/2073-4409/10/9/2256>
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3390/cells10092256
dc.identifier.issn2073-4409
dc.identifier.opus-id17218
dc.identifier.urihttps://open.fau.de/handle/openfau/17218
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:bvb:29-opus4-172186
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherMDPI
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/deed.de
dc.subjectbone tissue engineering
dc.subjectcritical size defect
dc.subjectirradiation
dc.subjectmesenchymal stem cells
dc.subjecthydroxyapatite
dc.subject.ddcDDC Classification::6 Technik, Medizin, angewandte Wissenschaften :: 61 Medizin und Gesundheit :: 610 Medizin und Gesundheit
dc.titleFree Transplantation of a Tissue Engineered Bone Graft into an Irradiated, Critical-Size Femoral Defect in Ratsen
dc.typearticle
dcterms.publisherFriedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU)
local.date.prevpublished2021-08-31
local.document.articlenumber2256
local.journal.issue9
local.journal.titleCells
local.journal.volume10
local.sendToDnbfree*
local.subject.fakultaetMedizinische Fakultät
local.subject.importimport
local.subject.sammlungUniversität Erlangen-Nürnberg / Eingespielte Open Access Artikel / Eingespielte Open Access Artikel 2021
local.subject.sammlungUniversität Erlangen-Nürnberg / Von der FAU geförderte Open Access Artikel / Von der FAU geförderte Open Access Artikel 2021
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