Differences in Mobility and Dispersal Capacity Determine Body Size Clines in Two Common Alpine-Tundra Arthropods

Language
en
Document Type
Article
Issue Date
2020-03-11
First published
2020-01-22
Issue Year
2020
Authors
Beckers, Niklas
Hein, Nils
Anneser, Alessa
Vanselow, Kim A.
Löffler, Jörg
Editor
Publisher
MDPI
Abstract

The Arctic is projected to be severely impacted by changes in temperature and precipitation. Species react to these changes by shifts in ranges, phenology, and body size. In ectotherms, the patterns of body size clines and their underlying mechanisms are often hard to untangle. Mountains provide a space-for-time substitute to study these shifts along multiple spatial gradients. As such, mobility and dispersal capacity might conceal reactions with elevation. We test this influence on body size clines by comparing two common arthropods of the alpine tundra. We find that high mobility in the lycosid spider Pardosa palustris blurs elevational effects. Partially low mobility at least during development makes the carabid beetle Amara alpina more susceptible to elevational effects. Specific life-history mechanisms, such as brood care in lycosid spiders and holometabolic development in carabid beetles, are the possible cause.

Journal Title
Insects
Volume
11
Issue
2
Citation
Insects 11.2 (2020): 74. <https://www.mdpi.com/2075-4450/11/2/74>
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